Cemetery Statuary II

As I’ve noted in my last post, the statuary in Buenos Aires’ Ricoleta cemetery tends toward the hyperbolic. Mies van der Rohe, of the famous “less is more” dictum, would be spinning in the grave under his minimalist granite slab of a tombstone should he have been interred here. Here follow three more photographs of angels and maidens, eternal in marble.

 

Ricoleta28.wp

 

Ricoleta20.wp

 

Ricoleta18.wp

9 responses

  1. A rather stunning image, I really like the mood in this shot :-)

    June 3, 2014 at 4:57 am

  2. My favorite… Is the lone angel that appears to be guarding the city behind her. Another wonderful set of images.

    June 5, 2014 at 7:35 pm

  3. The places you cover and the way you capture them continues to amaze me, I love the choice of black and white in this set of images.

    June 8, 2014 at 6:05 pm

    • Thanks, Adam! B&W was a no-brainer for these, just because of the contrasts and subject matter. I’m glad you liked them.

      June 8, 2014 at 7:11 pm

  4. I am intrigued by the family’s intent in the middle image… obviously some kind of generational (sorry for that word, but closest I could get…) homage, though not entirely sure “Grandma” is being captured for all time at her loving best up there! I am always interested in what these memorials were supposed to convey to the surviving family members… this one being a particularly rich example. Your ability to capture both the elegance of detail and the particulate decay of these exposed stonework is lovely. [p.s. I am bentbottle’s cousin and found your work through link to this blog … very excited for the library exhibit and hope you three get a wonderful reception.]

    July 11, 2014 at 9:48 pm

    • Thanks Nancy! Well, your cousin was the one that made the show happen, so he gets the lion’s share of the credit for any success we have. I’m with you on the “Grandma” figure, though I guess my background assumption about all of this statuary is that it’s more geared towards society than family. This was, and is, a cemetery for the rich and famous, and these statues seem more a final ostentatious gesture of wealth than a sincere token of remembrance.

      July 11, 2014 at 10:20 pm

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